Chaos fungorum Edible Forest Garden mix 1kg tub

£58.00

Formerly ‘Jake’s Mycorrhiza Mix’, Specially formulated for forest gardens and tree, shrub and perennial crops, this mix contains spores from 15-25 of edible mycorrhizal fungi, which will provide compatible species for most species.

** NB only available from November onwards **

Made with biochar from sustainably coppiced British woodland and natural additives to encourage mycelial growth; and from spores collected from wild edible species from ancient British woodland, this mix should provide suitable mycorrhizal partners for almost any plant, boosting growth and in the long term, given the right environment, edible mushrooms may start to form. 1 Kg is enough for 50 large bare root or container grown trees, or up to 500 small hedging trees.

Out of stock - please email to reserve for autumn/winter 2019

SKU: PL-9001 Category:

Description

Formerly ‘Jake’s Mycorrhiza Mix’, Specially formulated for forest gardens including tree crops, this mix contains spores from 15-25 of edible mycorrhizal fungi, which will provide compatible species for most species.

** NB only available from November onwards **

Made with biochar from sustainably coppiced British woodland and natural additives to encourage mycelial growth; and from spores collected from wild edible species from ancient British woodland, this mix should provide suitable mycorrhizal partners for almost any plant (apart from brassicas and ericaceous plants), boosting growth and in the long term, given the right environment, edible mushrooms may start to form. 1kg is enough to inoculate about 50 large bare root or container grown trees, or up to 500 small hedging trees or small shrubs/perennials.

Contains approximately 2000 spores per gram mixed with finely graded biochar from sustainably coppiced British woodland, plus added vitamins and minerals to encourage mycelial growth. Can be used on its own or mixed with other granular mycorhizzal mixes to aid diversity – ideal for planting new woodland, orchards and hedging. Also includes a mixture of native endomycorrhizal species, including Rhizophagus intraradices and Glomus mossae, that will benefit most non-tree species planted nearby (for instance ground cover plants, shrubs etc).

This year’s mix includes:

  • Amanita crocea, Orange Grisette – A good edible Amanita, occurs with a wide range of deciduous and coniferous trees including beech, oak, sweet chestnut, birch and pine.;
  • Amanita fulva, Tawny Grisette – A beautiful mushroom and a good edible (must be cooked), occurs naturally with beech, oak, sweet chestnut, birch and pine.;
  • Amanita rubescens, The Blusher – A very common mushroom, and an excellent edible (though it must be cooked), happy with a wide range
    of deciduous and coniferous trees.;
  • Amanita vaginata, The Grisette – As for Amanita fulva, differing principally in the grey colouration of the cap. A good edible though extra care must be taken in identification to avoid confusion with the deadly Amanitas.;
  • Boletus badius, Bay Bolete – A good edible, happy with a very wide range of trees.;
  • Boletus edulis, Penny bun, – Also known as the Cep or Porcini, this is perhaps the best eating of all the wild fungi. Occurs with a very wide range of trees both deciduous and coniferous.;
  • Boletus luridiformis, Scarletina Bolete – An excellent edible, like the Penny bun (Boletus edulis) except with startling blue and red colouration, likes beech, oak and pine.;
  • Cantharellus amethystea, Chanterelle – The most abundant local species of Chanterelle here in North Pembrokeshire, just as good to eat as the more usual Cantharellus cibarius but differentiated by the spore colour and amethyst tones of the cap. Grows with many trees but principally with oak, beech and pine.;
  • Cantharellus cibarius, Chanterelle – Needs no introduction, one of the very best edible mushrooms and found principally with oak, beech and pine.;
  • Craterellus tubaeformis, Winter or Trumpet Chanterelle – A very good edible, excellent for drying, fruits in the autumn and early winter, surviving early frosts. At least partially saprotrophic – helps decompose dead wood and stumps. Happy with many trees both deciduous and coniferous.;
  • Hydnum repandum, Hedgehog Mushroom – one of the best edible mushrooms, grows with a wide range of deciduous and coniferous trees.;
  • Hydnum rufescens, Hedgehog Mushroom – as above, but with a distinctive reddish colour to the cap. Excellent eating.;
  • Lactarius deterrimus, False Saffron Milk-cap – grows with spruce and pine, a decent edible like the better known Saffron Milk-cap.;
  • Laccaria amethystina, Amethyst Deceiver – A very common and gregarious mushroom, happy with almost any tree, and decent to eat.;
  • Laccaria laccata, The Deceiver – As above, but flesh/buff coloured.;
  • Leccinum scabrum, Brown Birch Bolete – A common mycorrhizal mushroom associated with birches. Good dried.;
  • Leccinum versipelle, Orange Birch Bolete – Another excellent edible mushroom which associates with birches.;
  • Lycoperdon perlatum, Common puffball – A saprobe that is sometimes also cited as mycorrhizal. something its habit strongly suggests to me. An extremely common mushroom which occurs in many woodland habitats, thought to form mycorrhizal associations with Pinus, Cedrus and Picea species.;
  • Morchella spp. , Black morel – One of the very best edible mushrooms, particularly when dried. Appears in the spring. Associates, unusually, with species which are largely or exclusively endomycorrhizal, including Malus, Ulmus and Fraxinus spp., as well as growing on its own as a saprobe. Morchella species have also been known to associate with non-woody plants such as sunflowers and orchids.;
  • Russula cyanoxantha – The Charcoal Burner – A good edible Russula, happy with most broadleaved trees, easily distinguished from other Russulas by its flexible (rather than brittle) gills.;
  • Russula ochroleuca, Common Yellow Russula – happy with a wide range of trees, a good firm fleshed mushroom.;
  • Suillus grevillei, Larch Bolete – edible (the cap skin should be peeled), occurs with Larix species. Good dried.;
  • Suillus luteus, Slippery Jack – found in association with pines, a good edible (the cap skin should be peeled.)

Planting instructions: Shake container well and sprinkle approximately 20g (2 tablespoons/ a small handful) of mix directly into the planting hole or onto the roots of any bare root tree or shrub when planting. Take care to water well.

Additional information

Weight 1.00 kg