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On Useful Plants

Showing 1–12 of 19 products

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    Bamboos

    £10.00

    by Martin Crawford, 2nd Rev Edition, April 1997. ISBN 1-874275-32-7. A5, 48 pges.. Covers over 100 species of bamboo which can be grown in temperate climates. Includes sections on cultivation and management, using bamboos for ground cover, hedging, cane production and edible shoot production, and an extensive bamboo directory section which gives details of all species and varieties available in Britain, along with synonyms and common names (English, Chinese and Japanese).


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    Ground Cover Plants

    £12.00

    by Martin Crawford, 2nd Rev Edition published December 1997. ISBN 1-874275-34-3. A4.. Revised and updated, the new edition contains new sections on grass-based ground covers, paths, and ground covers for the short, medium and long term. Includes many new plants, with over 850 species described. Includes easy-to-read tables and sections on mixing species for better cover.


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    Nitrogen-fixing Plants for Temperate Climates

    £12.00

    by Martin Crawford, 2nd rev Edition, 1998. ISBN 1-874275-38-6. A4, 89 pages.. Plants which fix nitrogen (ie utilise nitrogen from the air) are some of the most useful plants in agriculture, horticulture, forestry and agroforestry. Their use can lead to much reduced fertiliser usage, lower losses of soil nitrogen through leaching, and improved soil fertility through increased soil organic matter. Most people only know of the legumes as nitrogen-fixers, however, there are several other plants groups which do so, notably the so-called actinorhizal plants (including alders, Elaeagnus, sea buckthorn) which are mostly of temperate origin and better-suited to cool temperate climates. This directory describes the different groups of plants which fix nitrogen, including the legumes, the actinorhizal plants, liverworts, and lichens. Most fixation occurs via a symbiotic relationship with bacteria in root nodules, and the nodulation status of temperate genera are listed, with notes on cross-compatibility between different strains of bacteria and different genera. The nitrogen contributions which N-fixing plants can make are discussed, and an overview of the different uses given, including their use in forest and fruiting gardens as well as in forestry and agriculture. The main parts of the directory describe over 450 different species and their in-depth uses. This includes tables, organised by plant type, showing conditions required and uses of all species.


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    Plants for Hedging

    £10.00

    by Martin Crawford 1st Edition, November 1993. ISBN 1-874275-20-3. A4, 43 pages.. Covers some 450 species of trees and shrubs which are used for hedging and shelterbelts. Details given include siting and performance, other uses of species, and any particular techniques used when being grown in hedges.


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    Plants for Basketry

    £10.00

    by Martin Crawford 1st Edition, November 1993. ISBN 1-874275-21-1. A4, 50 pages.. Covers over 300 species, mainly shrubs and trees, which can be used for basketry. Details of siting and performance are given, as well as any cultural techniques normally used to provide material for basketry, and other uses of species.


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    Bee Plants

    £12.00

    by Martin Crawford, 2000. ISBN 1-874275-22-X. A4, 111 pages.. A directory giving details of over 1050 species which are of use to bees, both wild and hive. Details include time of year of benefit (eg flowering for nectar production), type of benefit (nectar, pollen, honeydew etc.), siting requirements etc.


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    Dye Plants

    £12.00

    by Martin Crawford, 1st Edition, Nov 1993. ISBN 1-874275-23-8. A4, 69 pages.. Contains details of over 550 species, from trees to lichens, from which dyes can be obtained. Details given include siting requirements, performance indicators, and the colours obtained using different mordants and on different fabrics.


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    Timber Trees for Temperate Climates

    £12.00

    by Martin Crawford, 2nd Edition, October 1993. ISBN 1-874275-17-3. A4, 91 pages.. A directory of timber-producing trees for temperate climates, with some 500 species included. Information given includes common names, origin, hardiness zones, pH, moisture and light requirements, height at 10 years of age and maximum height, timber properties (strength, durability, heaviness, hardness, shock absorbency, splittability, flexibility, fragrancy) and all reported timber uses. The second section contains a breakdown of different timber uses, with lists of species with timber used in those ways. Includes a full index including common names.


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    Plants for a Future

    £19.95

    by Ken Fern, Permanent, Publications, 1997. ISBN 1-85623-011-2. 302 pp.. This excellent book is a great introduction to many unusual tree, shrub and other plants with uses (mostly edible).Most of the book consists of descriptions and details of over 650 useful species, including trees, shrubs, climbers, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, in the flower garden, plants with edible leaves and flowers, with edible roots, and with edible fruits, perennial vegetables and herbs, water plants, plants for edible lawns, plants for walls and fences, plants for hedges, ground covers, annuals & biennials, the wild garden. Includes 48 colour photographs. Recommended.


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    Edible Plants for Temperate Climates

    £25.00

    by Martin Crawford, 2nd Edition, June 1998. ISBN 1-874275-36-X. A4, 218 pages.. A massive directory containing details of all plants, from trees to annuals and algae to fungi, which can be grown in temperate climates and be used for food in some way. Siting and performance details listed are as for the ‘Useful Plants’ series. Over 4500 species are included, fully indexed.


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    Volume 1: Trees

    £12.00

    by Martin Crawford (classified by size) 3rd Edition, Sept 1993. ISBN 1-874275-10-6. A4, 101 pages.. Useful Plants for Temperate Climates: Covering some 1400 tree species, the directory section is split into three categories for ease of forest garden design: large, medium and small trees.


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    Volume 1a: Trees (alphabetical)

    £12.00

    by Martin Crawford (alphabetical) 2nd Edition, Sept 1993. ISBN 1-874275-11-4. A4, 85 pages.. Useful Plants for Temperate Climates: Covers some 1400 species – the same information as in Volume 1, but the directory is ordered in alphabetical order of Latin names.