jaysea

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  • in reply to: Gaultheria shallon / Salal #16827
    jaysea
    Member

    Okay sounds good. I’ll purchase some of your seed at some point.

    After thinking on the second point, I’m thinking maybe crossing it with a prostrate Gaultheria would be useful – then it would be more a spreading groundcover and not waste so much energy on woody stems.

    in reply to: Manuka #16826
    jaysea
    Member

    I have no experience of planting it as a windbreak (although in a few months – I will probably have a different answer, as the property I’m moving to is sheltered by manuka). I have seen it all over NZ in some severely exposed locations, and it can handle the wind fine. It’s not a particularly fast growing plant by international standards, and it can get a bit ‘leggy’ (i.e. long scraggly branches) if it’s not actually that windy (so would eventually need underplanting).
    I’m interested why you want to plant it though

    in reply to: Willow for drainage #16815
    jaysea
    Member

    Have you checked to see whether there is a pan? (i.e. dug down a few test sites) There may be no pan, and it’s just a clay layer or so.

    Secondly – when does it get waterlogged? If it’s during winter, then I suspect willows won’t be of huge help then (although planting any trees there will improve the soil) as they’ll have gone dormant for the year and won’t take up any water. If they have a plentiful supply of water in Spring – they have no incentive to send out deep taproots and will just send out lateral roots (willows are famous for lateral roots).
    Depending on your local climate, evergreen trees may have a longer growing season than deciduous and may still be uptaking water during winter.

    I suspect I may have similar conditions on a site that I’ve yet to plant (in New Zealand), and I plan to experiment with Gunnera (if possible, I have to check regulations again – for example G. tinctoria is banned but I think G. manicata isn’t) for this case. Gunnera have been documented to grow for 11-12 months during the year nearby my site (which gets close to zero, but rarely frosts), and are extremely vigorous (they fix nitrogen using Gnostoc bacteria – a little-known extra class of N-fixers that most people don’t use) and are edible too (wikipedia claims they are sold on the street in Chile). If they can grow during winter and uptake water, then hopefully they can be chopped to the ground during Spring and Summer to leave the water available for other plants (i.e. in effect – ‘turning off the pump’).

    in reply to: Paulownia Tomentosa #16814
    jaysea
    Member

    I’ve recently seen Paulownia planted in the open in the Hoyt arboretum, Portland, OR. Both were struggling, with half of the foliage dead (as were some of the legumes). By contrast, if you look on YouTube for the WeGrow operation in Germany, you’ll their Paulownia seedlings (I think they actually plant out in Spain) reach tree size in under a year (!).
    It probably depends on the climate you can offer whether it’s worth trying or not.

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