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(P) Pests & Diseases

Showing 1–12 of 26 products

  • Factsheet P01: Fireblight

    £1.00

    Fireblight is a bacterial disease of plants in the sub-family Pomoideae of the family Rosaceae (ie plants with apple-like fruits), caused by Erwinia amylovora. Known about in North America for 200 years, it as since spread via infected material to many other parts of the world, including Central America, the near east and New Zealand; it continues to spread. It was discovered in Kent in 1957 and in now widespread in Europe. Quarantine regulations continue be imposed and have, for example, kept the disease out of Australia to date.


  • Factsheet P02: Canker of apple & pear

    £1.00

    Apple and pear canker is a fungal disease caused by Nectria galligena, well known in Western Europe, Asia, South and North America and New Zealand. Though most serious on apples and pears, it is also found on a range of broad-leaved trees including maples (Acer spp.), birches (Betula spp.), hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), beech (Fagus spp.), ash (Fraxinus excelsior), poplars (Populus spp.), oaks (Quercus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.)


  • Factsheet P03: Codling moth

    £1.00

    The codling moth, Cydia pomonella (Syn. Laspeyresia pomonella), is one of the most widespread pests of apple, occurring in almost every country in which apples are grown. The damage is caused by the caterpillar (sometimes called the apple maggot – not to be confused with Rhagoletis pomonella from North America), which burrows into the fruit.


  • Factsheet P04: Scab of apple & pear

    £1.00

    Apple scab, Venturia inaequalis, is one of the most widespread diseases of apple trees. Pear scab, Venturia pirina is common on pears and is virtually identical in biology and control to apple scab. These fungal diseases occur wherever apples and pears are grown, but are most severe in areas with moist, temperate springs and summers; pear scab is more serious in Europe than in North America. Commercially, scab can cause almost total destruction of an economic crop, especially in susceptible cultivars. Hence, except for organic crops, nearly all commercial crops are sprayed with fungicides against the diseases.


  • Factsheet P05: Apple powdery mildew

    £1.00

    Powdery mildew of apples is caused by the fungus Podosphaera leucotricha, and is present in all apple growing regions of the world. Once considered mainly a disease of nursery stock, it is now a major apple disease of commercial orchards, particularly in semi-arid areas.


  • Factsheet P06: Bacterial canker of plum & cherry

    £1.00

    Bacterial canker (also called gummosis and bacterial blast) of stone fruit crops is caused by three pathovars of the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae: P.s. pv. syringae attacks all stone fruit species grown commercially; P.s. pv. morsprunum attacks cherry and plum; and P.s. pv. persicae attacks peach trees in France. This article focuses on the first two of these in relation to plums and cherries; since the essential features of the disease caused by each pathovar are essentially the same, they are henceforth treated together.


  • Factsheet P07: Brown rot

    £1.00

    The brown rot fungi, Monilinia fructicola, M.fructigena and M.laxa (all sometimes called by the synonym Sclerotinia) cause considerable damage to cultivated fruit trees, particularly apples, pears and stone fruits, in the temperate regions of the world.


  • Factsheet P08: Honey fungus

    £1.00

    Honey fungus – prized by fungus eaters but alarming to tree growers – is one of the most important tree pathogens, with a world-wide distribution in both forest and non-forest habitats. The name ‘honey’ refers to the light brown caps of the toadstools, which are usually formed in early autumn. It is also known as bootlace fungus, shoestring fungus and Armillaria root rot.


  • Factsheet P09: Vine weevil

    £1.00

    Vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus, can be a serious pest particularly of perennials and potted plants.
    In recent years, good control of vine weevil has been possible by the use of a biological control. This is a much more ecologically sound method than the use of strong insecticides which are still sometimes used against the adults, or are mixed with composts to act against the grubs.


  • Factsheet P10: Silverleaf

    £1.00

    Silverleaf disease is a fungus, Chondrostereum purpureum, which causes serious losses of fruiting trees in Europe, Asia, South America and New Zealand, and occasional losses in North America.


  • Factsheet P11: Grey mold

    £1.00

    Grey mold is a very common fungal wound parasite which can attack any dead or dying plant material, sometimes also live material. Its spores are ubiquitous and infection can never be completely avoided in a humid climate.


  • Factsheet P12: Plum fruit moth

    £1.00

    The plum fruit moth (or plum moth), Latin name Cydia funebrana (Syns. Laspeyresia funebrana, Grapholitha funebrana) is prevalent in temperate regions of the world and is a major pest of plum. It is closely related to the apple codling moth (Cydia pomonella). It is often found in the wild on blackthorn (Prunus spinosa). Its larva are often called red plum maggots.